Portobello Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) - grow culture  Gourmet Edible & Medicinal Culture | Spore Spot
Portobello Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) - grow culture  Gourmet Edible & Medicinal Culture | Spore Spot

Portobello Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) - grow culture

Vendor
Spore Spot
Regular price
R 250.00
Sale price
R 250.00
Quantity must be 1 or more

Agaricus bisporus is an edible basidiomycete mushroom, with a little culinary flair it's anything but boring. It has two color states while immature—white and brown—both of which have various names. When mature, it is known as portobello mushroom (also portabella or portobella).
When immature and white, this mushroom may be known as: 

  • common mushroom, 
  • button mushroom, 
  • cultivated mushroom, 
  • table mushroom, 
  • crimini mushroom and champignon mushroom.

A Button mushroom spore print is a dark brown, which is why you see the mushrooms in the store as white on top with blackish gills underneath. The flesh is white, but will turn a pinkish color upon bruising. Eventually the pink will turn brown. You'll see this if you put a lot of pressure on your mushrooms while handling them. When immature and brown, it may be known variously as:

  • Swiss brown mushroom, 
  • Roman brown mushroom, 
  • Italian brown mushroom, 
  • cremini/crimini mushroom, or chestnut mushroom.

    While A. bisporus is native to grasslands in Europe and North America, it is cultivated in more than seventy countries, and is one of the most commonly and widely consumed mushrooms in the world.

    The button mushroom might take the lime light on medical boards, it certainly takes the spot light in the kitchen. However, there is research interest in the common mushroom and its potential to boost the immune system and fight cancer.

    Today's commercial variety of the common mushroom originally was a light brown color. In 1926, a Pennsylvania mushroom farmer found a clump of common mushrooms with white caps in his mushroom bed. As with the reception of white bread, it was seen as a more attractive food item and became very popular. Cultures were grown from these mutant individuals, and most of the cream-colored store mushrooms marketed today are products of this 1926 chance natural mutation.

    This grow culture is in a 10ml syringe.

    We recommend using our syringe of button mushroom cultures or spore prints to inoculate horse manure substrate. 

     

    Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
    Energy 93 kJ (22 kcal)
    3.26 g
    Sugars 1.98 g
    Dietary fiber 1 g
    0.34 g
    3.09 g
    Vitamins Quantity%DV
    Thiamine (B1)
    7%      |    0.081 mg
    Riboflavin (B2)
    34%    |    0.402 mg
    Niacin (B3)
    24%    |    3.607 mg
    Pantothenic acid (B5)
    30%    |    1.497 mg
    Vitamin B6
    8%      |    0.104 mg
    Folate (B9)
    4%      |  17 μg
    Vitamin B12
    2%      |    0.04 μg
    Vitamin C
    3%      |    2.1 mg
    Vitamin D
    1%      |    0.2 μg
    Minerals Quantity%DV
    Iron
    4%      |       0.5 mg
    Magnesium
    3%      |      9 mg
    Phosphorus
    12%    |    86 mg
    Potassium
    7%      |  318 mg
    Sodium
    0%      |      3 mg
    Zinc
    5%      |      0.52 mg
    Other constituents Quantity
    Water 92.45 g

     

     

    Info from Wikipedia

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